Let's talk about cartoons (USA, Europe, Corea, etc. - Not japananime)

Started by Raffaele the Amigan, July 09, 2012, 05:42:31 am

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Chocofreak13

@raffaele, bella: i disagree. i don't take country of origin into account; if it looks like anime, it's anime. consider this: you wouldn't consider Airbender to be an anime, while you would consider Heroman a 'real' anime, simply because of the location in which it was produced? i consider both of them to be anime, even though both were made by americans, though one was in english and one was in japanese.

on the other side of the arguement, though Jem was animated in Japan, it is squarely an American Cartoon. Anime vs Cartoons boils down to style, not location.

Penti-chan

It's tricky with both sides of the argument; if it's on the country it was animated in, Darkwing Duck would be considered anime (Since it was animated by a studio in Tokyo for Disney), but if we're going on what country's company supplied the money to make it happen, the 2nd season of Big O is a cartoon (Since Cartoon Network funded that season).

I prefer to not think about it; it gives me a headache @_@

Chocofreak13

this is why i prefer to go with the simplest (and fairest) way. if it looks like anime, it's anime. whose to say that my art isn't manga, just because i'm not japanese? >:[

Bella

Ehh, I'll never consider a Western-created work (or non-Japanese, Eastern-Asian-created work for that matter) anime, but that's just me. It's the simplest way of classification in my mind, especially given the huge overlap that can exist among animation of different nationalities. (For instance, Avatar - which is a Western work that is done in lush, highly-detailed anime-like art style - and Crayon Shin-Chan, a Japanese work that's done in a simplistic, "cartoonish" art style).

Chocofreak13

but where does that leave Heroman? if you didn't read the article, it was created by Stan Lee. :\

Raffaele the Amigan

Well not to start a flame war, then it is just plain to call it anime international projects or anime international co-operations...
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Chocofreak13

i'd say we agree not to discuss it. saying that feels like it's less of an anime, like a second-class version. i've read a couple manga written and drawn here in the US. some were good, some were alright, and one was so horrible i didn't even get past the cover. but japanese-written manga runs the gambit of that, too, depending on your preference.
for that matter, if a cartoon is made based off a korean manhua, is it anime? i say yes, given that the style is the same (manhua tends to use more lines so it's argueably more elegant) and manhua are stocked in the same place as manga on bookstore shelves. i have yet to see this happen, but when it does (and it will someday, if it hasn't already), i'll be calling it anime.

manga and anime are global now. national boundaries shouldn't matter so long as the style is kept and the spirit remains. >:\