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Started by s8man, January 26, 2007, 07:11:52 am

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Bella

*peeks into long-lost Linux thread*

No wai! It's an IanDanKilmaster sighting! I see you're back, with some new Python skills and a Boondocks-riffic avatar! :D

@The Ubuntu people's love of reinstalling: Oh lawd, maybe Debian is the right distro for me! Tell me, do Debian-ists like reinstallations? Cause I don't T__T

@ The Club: yeah, there was a bit of flak at first, but when we ended up being a peaceable bunch and no flamewars broke out, the heat died down. ;)

@ Inkscape needing mathematics skill: Honestly, I kinda thought the same thing of vector graphics at first, too. But I find Inkscape to be one of the most intuitive and enjoyable graphics programs I've used, raster or vector. I'd recommend just starting it up, and playing around--you'll begin to get the hang of it!

@ You guys' cr4zy ski11z: Wow! I can barely even handle a command line! Okay, not really, but my interest lies more in the historical aspect of it. (IOW, learning to use a computer as they've been used for the past 40 years) :P

*Bella away!*

*leaves thread*

IanDanKilmaster

QuoteNo wai! It's an IanDanKilmaster sighting! I see you're back, with some new Python skills and a Boondocks-riffic avatar!


"Jean-Claude Van Damme's the best martial artist in the world. He killed a man with his butt cheek power."

Okay, so maybe that quote's a little esoteric, but it just so happens it's one of the few by Uncle Ruckus I can manage to quote without heavy editing. ^__^

I guess next I'll do a Metalocalypse or Squidbillies avatar, I've been wanting to make a FLCL avatar, but I wanna make sure my next GIMP'd image looks waaaay better than my previous efforts.

As far as Python skills go, I'm just starting with it, so you could probably read an hours' worth of text and learn as much as I know ^__^".

Quote@The Ubuntu people's love of reinstalling: Oh lawd, maybe Debian is the right distro for me! Tell me, do Debian-ists like reinstallations? Cause I don't T__T


Well, I wouldn't say the 'Buntu folks love re-installing, but it currently beats the hell outta the alternative (dist-upgrade blows chunks, had to fall back to command line to get things to work fully).

Quote@ Inkscape needing mathematics skill: Honestly, I kinda thought the same thing of vector graphics at first, too. But I find Inkscape to be one of the most intuitive and enjoyable graphics programs I've used, raster or vector. I'd recommend just starting it up, and playing around--you'll begin to get the hang of it!


Let it be known that my artistic skill isn't all that great either, be it pencil & paper, mouse, whatevs... I suck.

Quote@ You guys' cr4zy ski11z: Wow! I can barely even handle a command line! Okay, not really, but my interest lies more in the historical aspect of it. (IOW, learning to use a computer as they've been used for the past 40 years) :P


Well, I would hardly say I've mastered the command line, but I've come to prefer it in some ways to the GUI.  For one thing, if you can decipher the commands, you'll actually know what the hell you're doing.  By contrast, GUIs can often be riddled with bugs and you can't be altogether sure there isn't some missed error in the code that will botch your intended command.  What really bugs me is there seems to be some consensus among the admins and mods at ubuntuforums that the command line is out and everything that can be possibly done using the GUI, should.  Tutorials and HowTos using the commandline in the ubuntuforums is strongly discouraged, and that pisses me off.  Of course, far too many of the Tutorials that utilize copy & paste commands fail to actually explain what it is that the command does, leading to problems such as the "sudo rm -rf" fiasco.  If more people in the ubuntuforums took the "teach a man to fish" approach to HowTos, the command line wouldn't seem like such a scary thing to so many users, but whatevs... I guess I'm ranting now -.-.

The Choice of a New Generation.

C-Chan

Quote@The Ubuntu people's love of reinstalling: Oh lawd, maybe Debian is the right distro for me! Tell me, do Debian-ists like reinstallations? Cause I don't T__T


I can probably answer that with a flat-out "NO".  

Certainly not from the Stable branch folk, but the Unstable folk might have more reason to every once in a while.  On the other hand, if you're advanced enough to DARE to try the Sid branch, you're probably advanced enough to fix your system without reinstalling.  ^__^;

Quote@ You guys' cr4zy ski11z: Wow! I can barely even handle a command line! Okay, not really, but my interest lies more in the historical aspect of it. (IOW, learning to use a computer as they've been used for the past 40 years) :P


Well you might not have a choice... as my OS-tan games progress start to get more accessible, you'll have no choice but to give into the curiosity and learn some of the code.  I'm sure it will be quite inviting.  ^.^

QuoteWell, I would hardly say I've mastered the command line, but I've come to prefer it in some ways to the GUI. For one thing, if you can decipher the commands, you'll actually know what the hell you're doing. By contrast, GUIs can often be riddled with bugs and you can't be altogether sure there isn't some missed error in the code that will botch your intended command. What really bugs me is there seems to be some consensus among the admins and mods at ubuntuforums that the command line is out and everything that can be possibly done using the GUI, should. Tutorials and HowTos using the commandline in the ubuntuforums is strongly discouraged, and that pisses me off. Of course, far too many of the Tutorials that utilize copy & paste commands fail to actually explain what it is that the command does, leading to problems such as the "sudo rm -rf" fiasco. If more people in the ubuntuforums took the "teach a man to fish" approach to HowTos, the command line wouldn't seem like such a scary thing to so many users, but whatevs... I guess I'm ranting now -.-.


I reckon I might fall into the same category.  ^^

But while I can navigate the command line well-enough, I'm too visually-oriented to like it.  I needz ma graphix.  ^.^

On the other hand, having visually-stunning command line screens is a good enough compromise. ^___^

Speaking of visually stunning ASCII art, how about some more Python sample games from my book for you to decipher?  All of them received the same "OS-tan-inspired modifications" as the previous sample.  ^.^

The critter.py one, btw, demonstrates the first use of Object-Oriented Programming in the book -- in all honesty, it's not at all as bad as it sounds.  I actually think I might LOVE objects.  ^___^

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IanDanKilmaster

QuoteBut while I can navigate the command line well-enough, I'm too visually-oriented to like it. I needz ma graphix. ^.^


Command-line lust is more or less a type of "god complex", after keying in a really useful command, you think, "I can do that?!"  Sort of addicting after you've been burned by a few glitchy GUI implements.  I mean, trust me, you're not going to catch me saying "I'd rather use the command-line." if I can truly trust a GUI to do the same task, but no matter what the so-called "gurus" at ubuntuforums think, Linux will always have a command-line and there will always be things that work better from the command-line (e.g. FFmpeg).

QuoteThe critter.py one, btw, demonstrates the first use of Object-Oriented Programming in the book -- in all honesty, it's not at all as bad as it sounds. I actually think I might LOVE objects. ^___^


Ok, dl'ed it, but I'll probably do some more studying before I try it... or I might just succumb to curiousity like I usually do.

The Choice of a New Generation.

C-Chan

QuoteCommand-line lust is more or less a type of "god complex", after keying in a really useful command, you think, "I can do that?!" Sort of addicting after you've been burned by a few glitchy GUI implements. I mean, trust me, you're not going to catch me saying "I'd rather use the command-line." if I can truly trust a GUI to do the same task, but no matter what the so-called "gurus" at ubuntuforums think, Linux will always have a command-line and there will always be things that work better from the command-line (e.g. FFmpeg).


Ah yes, the infamous ffmpeg.  :P
Well certainly a great example of CLI benefits is when a program mysteriously refuses to open.  Double-click on a desktop or Menu icon, maybe you'll see some feedback from the mouse,... and then,... nothing happens.  The program mysteriously peters off.  ''

But open it from the CLI, and it might tell you WHY the freakin' program isn't opening.  This has been especially helpful on the EeePC, where games defaulting to a 1024x768 resolution quietly refuse to open until I add the CLI option to change their resolution to something more palpable by the tiny screen.

Course as you say,... had the GUI been written properly, it would have accounted for such instances (say with a pop-up message stating that the resolution was too small, and maybe an offer to fix it automatically).

Before I left my Linux semi-development job, I was working on a pseudo-GUI for one of our LiveUSB install scripts.  I felt I showed great promise in the area, cause despite the limitations I was still able to produce a pseudo-GUI that was graphically-attractive, themeable, obsessively-documented and had built-in localization support.  (granted, most of this was unnecessary for the task, but it was still a great thought experiment)  :D

QuoteOk, dl'ed it, but I'll probably do some more studying before I try it... or I might just succumb to curiousity like I usually do.


If you do let me know.  My last CLI practice game from the book is a simplified version of BlackJack that uses several Classes (spread across two modules and the main application) to get the job done.  Although not entirely intuitive to follow for me (cause I don't play cards regularly), I do have a better idea of how objects interact in a modern software application.

Right now I've finally begun the chapter on GUI design, so I'm very very very very very very giddy.  ^___^

*wags tail*

NejinOniwa

Quote from: "C-Chan"*wags tail*

There, there. *pat pat*


...Shit, having a dog is taking its toll on me >_>
YOU COULD HAVE PREVENTED THIS

grant_p

For easy upgrades, you could always do what I do (and I am VERY non-technically inclined):

1. Download the ISO
2. Burn it
3. Try the Live-CD first
4. Back up EVERYTHING onto a CD/External HD/USB/whatever

5. Upgrade!

This way, if things go catastrophically wrong (and they have with me many times as I like to play with my VM's till they  die horribly) you have a full OS backup disk ready to go, then you just copy over your full backup and you're back up and running in 30 minutes.  I've never had trouble with this, and oddly, since I started backing up everything, I've not had to use it.

firstyear

yeah ima using gentoo linux myself its brillant, stable and is a pleasure over windows.

C-Chan

Funny that the only Gentoo-based system I've ever used was Sabayon.  It was neat, but at the time they only offered LiveDVDs, which gave me a lot of trouble on my [then] crappy hardware.

I'm still due to try out Pardus one of these days....